Tag Archives: Articles

Canada’s Best Places to Live 2017: CNV #72

Interesting comprehensive stats about our little City, rated #72 on the list.

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – A new report ranks Canada’s best places to live and affordability impacts many of the communities we live in here in Metro Vancouver.

The annual report from Money Sense named Ottawa as the top spot overall for the second straight year, but British Columbia was well represented near the top.

“BC actually does really well on this list. If I’m looking at the top 25, nine of those cities are in BC,” says Mark Brown from Money Sense. “No surprise, one of the things holding BC back is affordability. I don’t think that’s a secret.”

Oak Bay, just outside of Victoria placed third on the list, while North Saanich finished in fourth. Saanich and Central Saanich also cracked the top 14.

When it comes to Oak Bay, which happens to be the home riding for provincial Green Party leader, Andrew Weaver, Brown says, “It has access to all the great transit in the Victoria area but it’s also very well off. It’s a very high net worth community, homes are little bit more expensive but the residents appear to be able to afford it.”

In Metro Vancouver, the north shore boasted bragging rights.

“North Vancouver on the mainland does extremely well on our list. That’s a community that is extremely wealthy, has a very vibrant arts and community score. It also has access to transit. It comes in at number 20 overall on our list.” Port Moody, Delta and West Vancouver all cracked the top 25.

Population: 53,605
Economic Factors
Estimated Unemployment Rate 5.86%
Median Household Income $67,209
Average Value of Primary Real Estate $906,374
Average Rent $1,432
Average Property Tax $1,255
Average Income Tax $8,286
Mobility Factors
Population that walks to work: 6.8%
Population that bikes to work: 1.2%
Population that takes public transit to work: 13.8%
Weather Factors
Total Annual Rainfall: 1,698 mm
Days per year above 0ºC 297
Days per year above 20ºC 81
Health, Safety and Community Factors
Doctors per 1,000 residents: 3
Number of reported crimes per 100,000 residents 8,262
Percentage of residents employed in arts and recreation 3.9%

 

 

For a complete list of the rankings, click here.

Source: Canada’s Best Places to Live 2017: Create your own ranking

 

 

Density for sale $34.88 per square foot

Source: Decision on Onni’s bowling bid delayed 

From the North Shore News Jun 21st, comment from Voices:

The ‘over-excavated’ space will be a commercial venture, probably leased to an operator.   Bargain price: $275,000 for 7,884 sq ft = $34.88 per square foot.  Another 4-3 vote with the developer-funded slate voting in favour.

 

 

 

 

Stupid/can’t believe it/weird/ruining/ eyesore/shameful/dumb-ferris wheel

The comments above are part of facebook comments posted to the North Shore News coverage of this news: http://www.nsnews.com/news/ferris-wheel-approved-for-waterfront-next-summer-1.20573170.  

The article was posted yesterday and so far more than 200 people have chimed in with their thoughts.  We do note that the report that “Council united in support” can be taken with a grain of salt.  Councillors Bell, Bookham and Clark have previously expressed concerns.  For those Council watchers lately concerned with the seeming lack of engagement by residents, these comments prove that people are indeed paying attention.  The comments are exactly in the order posted on facebook, nothing positive yet.

For the benefit of those not on facebook these are the comments (names removed) to date:

 -What a stupid idea!! First they get rid of all local parking for the restaurants, now this which will interfere with driving in the vicinity. If actions speak louder than words it seems the developer driven CNV council is determined to drive all the small businesses out of the area. Why? To free up the space for developers?

It really can’t believe this idea has gotten approval. Practically every city has a Ferris wheel these days; the novelty is no longer there. I can’t imagine tourists coming to the Shore just to ride an overpriced wheel in the sky. Why don’t we build something for residents, like an outdoor pool or have a beautiful park instead? And where is this money coming from when the City somehow couldn’t find the money to restore the Brazenhead or the other shipping cranes as originally planned and promised? I, for one, am not a fan of this Ferris wheel.

-That photoshop looks weird. How can a Ferris wheel fit between Anatolis, Tap and Barrel and the new Presentation House? I thought counsel had ditched the original concept. (Where the Ferris wheel would be run by private biz and would be situated dockside (way south of drawing )! Something fishy here.

-I don’t think the Lower Lonsdale Business Improvement Assoc……really has the money for covering the expense or part of the expense….there is no big business in Lower Lonsdale….

-City Council is ruining Lower Lonsdale, 1st that ugly silver cube building that blocks the view of Vanc. waterfront, now a huge ridiculous ferris wheel???? Hope everyone remembers this next election time but by then it will be too late.

-What an eyesore. Is NV not getting enough attention? Enough taxes from the addition of thousands of homes? Do people not love NV for its natural beauty and tranquility? Why turn it into a cheap circus for the few people who can’t occupy themselves with something more meaningful than a silly ride? I just don’t get it..

-North Vancouver isnt the nice beautiful community i grew up loving.its gone all city n now this!ppl cant even afford to live here anymore hth do you think we could afford a ride on ferris wheel n wth would we want to???This is ALL FOR TOURISM isn’t there enough attractions?? THIS IS AN EYESORE!!!

-If people wanted a ferris wheel they could head over the bridge to the PNE. Except maybe the traffic situation is so bad they can’t get there anymore. Shameful and tacky.

-We need someone to run in the next election that will win the votes!!! Mussatto has been in office since 1995 and look at what he has created. This is ridiculous.
Local decisions brought us here not provincial, like people complained in the recent election. Who will run against Mussatto?

-Is this a joke? I live in that area and there is no room in that spot. Tap and barrel deck nearly done and the new arts building??!!

-dumb, dumb, dumb. I want to see mountains and trees, not skyscrapers and ferris wheels.

-no…no …please no…we don’t need this in our local community!! We have enough for attractions for tourists!!!! Please no!!!!

and more: Why not? They’ve already ruined the waterfront with all the condos and their atrocious “art gallery”.;We already have too much congestion on the North Shore we don’t need anymore.;Stupid idea…. ruins the view and not even original….; they are trying to turn lonsdale into a California feel fo sho;nother program that should assist with solving the transportation and housing affordability issues on the North Shore.;Y’all need to write letters rather than rant on fb posts. It’ll be heard a lot louder.;Seven seas should still be docked there; Ridiculous waste of money;Oh noooooo….I hadn’t heard about this in a long time. Thought it was history; 

and more.

 

Sky-high condo prices aren’t a supply problem

From the Globe and Mail (Gary Mason), quoting in part:

‘No, there is lots of “supply” in Vancouver and Toronto. That isn’t the issue. It’s who’s getting access to that supply that is a big part of the problem. And it’s also the type of “supply” being built.

Many of the condos being constructed are designed to be purchased by wealthy investors, the Lamborghini crowd. They aren’t being built for a couple of young professionals starting a family. Not unless you consider $1-million for 1,000-square-feet on the 10th floor of a tower in suburban Burnaby, B.C., reasonable. No, somehow, some way, governments need to encourage developers, through incentives or whatever it takes, to start building housing that the middle class can afford.

Right now, developers are getting everything their way. They are putting pressure on local politicians to speed up the approval process so they can erect more towers, more quickly, but they are doing nothing – nothing – about the costs of the units they are constructing. In fact, you could argue they are engaging in activity that is helping ensure the costs keep going up.

It’s ridiculous.’

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/sky-high-condo-prices-arent-a-supply-problem/article35091277/

Opinion: Housing reset — Supply myth exposed, but more of the same

Comment by Voices:  This article in the Vancouver Sun today applies equally to the City of North Vancouver.  Planned development is well ahead of the Strategic Growth Strategy, updated statistics to come shortly.  

Quoting in part: 

The City of Vancouver is finally admitting that they cannot build their way out of the housing affordability crisis. The supply myth has been driving ever-escalating amounts of market housing, but affordability is getting worse, not better. The city now says that “we have plenty of supply — what we need is the right supply.”

This is the conclusion of a recent report to council that proposes a housing reset. Although they correctly identify that a change of direction is needed, the city instead proposes more of the same.

The city has been approving market development at a record pace, yet prices continue to escalate. The new supply is not bringing affordability and never will if we continue doing the status quo.

In fact rezoning has been inflating land values while demolishing the older more affordable housing stock. People are being displaced and priced out of their city. This is what happens when the real estate market is disconnected from the local economy.

Many of the needed solutions are out of the city’s jurisdiction. However, the city’s own land-use policies of promoting unsustainable levels of market redevelopment has been largely responsible for enabling this crisis to escalate.

Source: Opinion: Housing reset — Supply myth exposed, but more of the same

 

 

Moodyville: neighbourhood neglected

Comment from Voices:  Councillor Clark made this inquiry at the City Council meeting on November 21st:

18. Moodyville Vandalism – File: 13-6520-20-0054/1 Inquiry by: Councillor Clark Councillor Clark inquired of Mayor Mussatto with respect to fires in vacant houses in the Moodyville area. Mayor Mussatto advised that staff will report back.

Now today, three months later, in the rush of homeowners and developers to cash in and a new neighbourhood supposedly planned for about 1900 new units this is happening?

From the North Shore News today:

The City of North Vancouver is looking to contend with some new challenges in Moodyville as the neighbourhood gradually empties out of old residents to make way for new development. North . . .

full article:    Source: Moodyville: neighbourhood neglected

District of North Vancouver council delves into transportation plan

Comment from Voices:  This article is very timely given the total traffic gridlock earlier this week during the morning rush hour.

Quoting in part from Councillors Hanson and Muri:  “We need to integrate our efforts with the other civic governments of the North Shore, who are contributing to density without in any way contributing to infrastructure, which is overtaxed,” and “it may be time to pull up the drawbridge on the North Shore. “I envision there’s room for 100 people at the party and there’s 500 in the lineup out the front door and they all want to come into the party. I just want to say to the 400, ‘You know what? We’re full now. You’re just going to have to wait your turn.’”

from the North Shore News:

Source: District of North Vancouver council delves into transportation plan

The District of North Vancouver is preparing to embark on a major review of its transportation master plan.

District council members met as an informal committee Tuesday afternoon to discuss what should be emphasized in the review, which is to begin in 2017.

Staff’s suggestions included a protected bicycle network, updating the district’s parking policies, a focus on the Main/Marine transit corridor, better co-ordination of traffic signals and whether the district ought to become a vision zero community – a growing movement among cities vowing to design their streets in such a way that there are zero traffic-related deaths or injuries.

But the informal session quickly turned to an airing of grievances as the morning commute of many councillors had been particularly exasperating with near-simultaneous crashes on the Cut, Stanley Park causeway and Westview overpass.

Coun. Jim Hanson said he faces the prospect of losing staff at his North Vancouver law firm, as their commute from across Burrard Inlet saps their quality of life. Hanson said the plan ought to come with some immediate steps that will alleviate congestion.

“I don’t sense the level of urgency in the plan that I sense in the public,” he said. “I’m just really frustrated with being a public official witnessing this failure – this systemic failure – of transportation infrastructure, which after all, is a core function of government.”

And, he added, it’s not just the district but also the province and the North Shore’s other municipalities that need to get on board.

“We need to integrate our efforts with the other civic governments of the North Shore, who are contributing to density without in any way contributing to infrastructure, which is overtaxed,” he said.

Coun. Mathew Bond, who is a transportation systems engineer, said his morning commute to Coquitlam took twice as long as it normally would have with a lineup of stop-and-go traffic on Highway 1 stretching 20 kilometres past the Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing.

While creating major new infrastructure takes years and billions of dollars, governments can help influence people’s decisions and improve traffic flow, he said, referring to things like incentivizing carpooling or charging drivers for using the roads at peak times.

“People can change their behaviour today if they so choose,” he said. “Doing some small, incremental things over time over the next two, three or five years, will buy us some time to make those major infrastructure investments and do those plans that are going to provide long-term relief.”

But Coun. Lisa Muri questioned whether residents could be persuaded to leave the car at home, especially when their work, errands or family commitments may require them to travel to several neighbourhoods, numerous times in the day.

“I don’t know how to change my behaviour to get from Lonsdale to Seymour without changing my whole family’s life,” she said. “It’s awesome to think that if you build it, people will get out of their cars and onto a bus or another mode of transportation but is it going to happen? . . .  People have cars. They want convenience. They want to be able to get to their destinations quickly.”

Instead, Muri suggested it may be time to pull up the drawbridge on the North Shore. “I envision there’s room for 100 people at the party and there’s 500 in the lineup out the front door and they all want to come into the party. I just want to say to the 400, ‘You know what? We’re full now. You’re just going to have to wait your turn.’ But we’re not doing that,” she said.

Coun. Robin Hicks rubbished the notion that trying to stop population growth would solve any problems, noting that banishing the North Shore’s service workers to the farther-flung suburbs would only add more cars onto local roads.

“We can’t put up barriers or walls like Trump might try to do. People are just going to come here from everywhere,” he said. “We’ve got to learn to live with the population.”

The district has, in partnership with senior levels of government, a number of transportation projects under way, including the new five-lane Keith Road bridge, which should open this fall, separated bike lanes on Lynn Valley Road scheduled to start this month, Spirit Trail connections, upgrades to Phibbs Exchange and $150 million in rebuilds of the Lower Lynn interchanges.

Coun. Roger Bassam and Mayor Richard Walton were absent from the meeting.